Recovery Week

This week I did some yoga, went on a few short runs and some walks.  My two walks were my favorite “workouts” of the week!

Friday I walked the bridge with two of my girl friends from PT school.  We caught up on ridiculous patient stories and other life events and follow it up with a shared bottle of wine.  We went right around sun set and I got some gorgeous pictures.

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Saturday I went with my friend JK for a walk (because there are no hills in Charleston so you can’t call it a hike) in the woods with our pups.  It was so awesome to just let the two girls off leash and have them run around like crazy while we walked and chatted and enjoyed the beautiful afternoon.

The trail was on an old plantation, this was from 1859!

The trail was on an old plantation, this was from 1859!

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Luckily we did not see any

Luckily we did not see any

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I had such a wonderful weekend recovering and spending a lot of time outside!!  Sometimes going for a walk is just what you need.

Now What?

So now that I have met my greatest, most distant running goal, what do I do?

Since I have followed Hal Higdon’s program to train for the race which worked like a charm, I figured why not use his recovery program as well.

He calls this week Zero Week.  I already screwed up what I was supposed to do after the race day of.  It says try to eat solid food as soon as possible and rehydrate.  I didn’t eat very much and drank a few celebratory beverages; probably why I am still sore.  Monday was supposed to be a rest day which it was.  Today he advocates a massage.  Since racing is expensive and I’m a poor student, my stick was going to have to do.

My version of a massage Photo Credit: thestick.com

My version of a massage
Photo Credit: thestick.com

 

 

 

 

I broke this bad boy out three times today and spent 5-10 minutes rolling out my quads, calves, hamstrings, Anterior Tibialis (muscle on the outside of your shin) and peroneals (further outside shin), IT band and the bottoms of my feet.  It certainly didn’t feel awesome, especially the quads but I am hoping getting out of the tree fort I call a bed will be easier in the morning for it.

I am starting to get quite antsy to run and he doesn’t “clear you” to run until Thursday.  I may take a short walk on the bridge tomorrow just to get out and do something.  I feel like such a bump on a log (even though I know this is irrational since I ran a marathon less than 48 hours ago).

Still living in a fantasy land and don’t see myself coming back down any time soon!  Hope you are having a fantastic week!

Recovery. What’s best?

Standing on a street corner wearing my most recent race shirt, waiting to cross today while I was out for a jog I saw a man on the opposite corner also rockin’ the same shirt. He yelled across the street

“Full or half?”

“Full” I said.  “Pretty good race huh?”

He simply replied, “You’re crazy!”

We both laughed and I continued on my way.

For the rest of the way home, I thought about all of the different ways I have gone about recovering and how it is such an individual part of training and racing.

After my first marathon, the best my memory can recall is that I did absolutely nothing.  Going to class seemed an olympic event to me I was in so much pain.  Likely due to the fact that the day of the race I crossed the finish line and sat/laid around for hours.

Since then, I have learned that pretty much for everyone it is a good idea to do some walking around the day of.  But where to go in the following week or two is totally up to you and your future goals.

Today, I went out for a short, slow, easy jog with no distance in mind just to get myself moving and kind of assess where my problems lie and how to progress from here.  I have always in that active recovery camp.  Be it biking, swimming, yoga, pilates, walking; for myself, getting moving is the best way for me to get back to moving.

I think the most important thing in these first two weeks is to do what you want to.  You have to give your brain a rest from the constant scheduling of certain distance runs and speed work and the obligation of running.  Take some time to remind yourself why you love it.  Even though I certainly didn’t feel even close 100% (my toe is going to be an evolving problem for a little while), today was one of my best runs mentally in a long run.  I was running because I wanted to!

So for the next few weeks I will be here in Charleston, falling in love all over again with running just to run!